Alumni

The Fulbright Program has more than 374,000 alumni from over 160 countries worldwide. Fulbright alumni include 33 current or former heads of state or government, 54 Nobel Laureates, 82 Pulitzer Prize winners, 29 MacArthur Foundation Fellows, 16 Presidential Medal of Freedom recipients, and thousands of leaders across the private, public and non-profit sectors. Five thousand of those alumni belong to the Australian-American program and received their Fulbright awards from the 1950s on. You are a part of this roll call of excellence.

We aspire to deepen and expand our connection with you. We want you to be committed and contributing partners in the fostering of mutual understanding through academic and cultural exchange between Australia and the U.S. that the Fulbright Program promotes.

Some of our alumni

Timothy McEvoy Professional Scholars

Home InstitutionUniversity of Melbourne, University of Virginia
Host InstitutionUniversity of Virginia and Georgetown University, Washington
Award Name2011 Fulbright Professional Australia-U.S. Alliance Studies Scholarship sponsored by the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade
DisciplineEducation
Award Year2011

“There are currently no treaties, whether bilateral or multilateral, by which judgments of Australian courts can be easily enforced in the U.S. and judgments of U.S. courts can be easily enforced in Australia. The absence of formal arrangements for the mutual recognition and enforcement of judgments sits uncomfortably with the close political and economic relationship that exists between Australia and the U.S. It is time to take reform of this area of the law out of the too-hard basket.”

Dr Timothy McEvoy, a member of the Victorian Bar, will spend the Fall Semester of 2011 in the School of Law at the University of Virginia and at Georgetown University in Washington D.C. through one of two 2011 Fulbright Professional Scholarships in Australia-U.S. Alliance Studies sponsored by the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade. DFAT sponsored a second scholarship for 2011 as part of the celebrations for the 60th Anniversary of the Fulbright Program.

“There is increasing recognition that the absence of formal arrangements between Australia and the U.S. for the recognition and enforcement of judgments is a major impediment to the developing trade relationship between the two countries. By increasing the uncertainties associated with enforcing legal rights, the absence of formal judgment recognition and enforcement arrangements impacts adversely on investment decisions. It has a chilling effect on the expansion of trade relations and ultimately the economic growth and prosperity of both countries”, Dr McEvoy said.

“The Australia US Free Trade Agreement is alive to the problem which the absence of formal arrangements for the mutual recognition and enforcement of judgments represents. It expresses a bilateral commitment to exploring the possibility of greater mutual recognition and enforcement of judgments obtained by the regulatory authorities of both countries in consumer protection cases.”

Dr McEvoy’s research will assess the desire for greater mutual recognition and enforcement of judgments expressed in the AUSFTA, and consider the potential form of a bilateral treaty for the recognition and enforcement of judgments between Australia and the U.S. An important part of his research will be consultation with key US stakeholders on the desirability and possible structure of a judgments recognition and enforcement convention with Australia.

Dr McEvoy has an LL.B (Hons) and an LL.M from the University of Melbourne, together with a BA in politics and history. In 1999 he received an SJD (Doctor of Juridical Science) from the University of Virginia. From 1998 to 2001 he was a member of the Australian delegation of experts to the Special Commission of the Hague Conference on Private International Law which drafted a global jurisdiction and judgments convention. He has been a Visiting Professor in the School of Law at the University of Virginia annually since 2001, and is currently the Senior Tutor in Law at Ormond College in the University of Melbourne. He sits on the board of the Parenting Research Centre and is married to fellow 2011 Fulbright Scholar Elizabeth Maynard. They have two daughters.

The prestigious Fulbright program is the largest educational scholarship of its kind, created by U.S. Senator J. William Fulbright and the U.S. Government in 1946. Aimed at promoting mutual understanding through educational exchange, it operates between the U.S. and 155 countries. In Australia, the scholarships are funded by the Australian and U.S. Governments and corporate partners and administered by the Australian-American Fulbright Commission in Canberra. Dr McEvoy is one of 26 talented Australians to be recognised as a Fulbright Scholar in 2011.

Mark McHenry Postdoctoral Scholars

Home InstitutionMurdoch University
Host InstitutionSandia National Laboratories
Award NameSandia National Laboratories
DisciplineClimate Change Mitigation Technologies
Award Year2012

“Increasing freshwater and energy demands and corresponding decreases in supply quantity and quality is stimulating cross-disciplinary investment in the energy-water nexus.”

Dr Mark McHenry, researching climate change mitigation technologies at Murdoch University, is the winner of the 2012 Fulbright WA Scholarship. The W.A. scholarship is supported through a fund established by donations from the W.A. government, W.A. based universities, companies, foundations and individuals.

Through his Fulbright Mark will carry out a project on waste energy, carbon, and water systems for inland industrial process mitigation with Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, for six months.

“My project seeks to critically review and model new waste energy, carbon and water intensive technologies that can be retrofitted to inland industrial facilities,” Mark said.

The project scope is narrowed to three new technologies that have a high potential to co-produce agricultural/aquacultural production inputs for inland regions: microalgal biofuels, thermal desalination, and solution mining. This work quantifies physical ‘energy and material flow’ data for ‘retrofitting’ new technologies for reduced net emissions, fresh water consumption, and energy waste from inland industrial processes, including electricity generators.

Mark has a BSc and PhD in physics from Murdoch University. He has won various awards and prizes including a Postdoctoral Endeavour Award Fellowship from the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations, and a Science and Innovation Award for Young People in Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry in 2007. He is also a founding member of the Rural Research and Development Council, and has published extensively. He is involved with various non-governmental organisations, and undertakes specialist research regarding renewable energy, carbon sequestration, and rural activities, technologies, and policies.

 

Craig William McCormack Postgraduate Students

Home InstitutionThe University of Western Australia
Host InstitutionSasakawa International Center for Space Architecture, University of Houston
Award NameFulbright Western Australia Postgraduate Scholarship
DisciplineArchitecture (Space Architecture)
Award Year2016

Craig is a PhD candidate at The University of Western Australia (UWA), in Perth, Australia. He holds an Australian Postgraduate Award, allowing him to research the discipline of Space Architecture and how the built environment in outer space is situated within and impacts the terrestrial discipline of architecture. Craig received an NVQ Level IV in Music from The London Music School in 1999, a Bachelor of Arts (Art) from the Curtin University of Technology in 2006, a Bachelor of Environmental Design from UWA in 2009, and a Masters of Architecture with High Distinction from UWA in 2011. As well as teaching and lecturing at UWA for the past six years Craig is also a director of felix. laboratories, a multi-disciplinary architecture and design practice that, as part of Felix, Giles, Anderson & Goad, were creative directors of the Australian Pavilion at the 2014 Venice Architecture Biennale. The exhibition, Augmented Australia 1914-2014, utilised augmented reality technology to realise significant, yet unbuilt contemporary and historical Australian architecture.

When not teaching and researching at university or designing within felix., Craig enjoys the outdoors leading an active lifestyle, and is an avid runner and climber. Widely travelled, he has climbed Mont Blanc and Mount Kilimanjaro in recent years. He believes that as an academic and a designer it is important to be active and involved in the world in order to design for it and write about it. Recently Craig has taken up the sport of motorcycle racing where he intends to qualify for his race license in the near future and add a little adrenaline to his weekends.

For his Fulbright Postgraduate Scholarship, Craig will conduct research at the University of Houston, in the Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture. The project will examine the feedback loop between the space industry and popular culture, such as film, through a study of relevant institutional and private archives, to articulate the cultural role that space exploration has played upon modern culture, and reciprocally, the impact that ideas stemming from popular culture as the ‘imagining’ of a future, or multiple futures has had upon programs of scientific research into manned exploration of space, and which has spawned new fields of research, such as ‘space architecture’. Combining archival, primary, and contemporary research through an ambitious theoretical framework, Craig intends to conceptualise the ‘space project’ within Western culture’s tradition of utopian thought.

Gus Schrader Postgraduate Students

Home InstitutionThe University of Melbourne
Host InstitutionUniversity of California, Berkeley
Award Name2011 International Fulbright Science and Technology Award
DisciplineMathematics
Award Year2011

“The mathematical methods that give us insight into physical problems are valuable not only for their specific applications, but also because each opens into a deep and beautiful subject in its own right. Indeed, the insights gained from studying physics-inspired problems have had far-reaching consequences in many areas of pure mathematics.”

Gus Schrader, who is currently undertaking a Masters of Philosophy in Mathematics at the University of Melbourne, is one of two Australians to have won a the Fulbright International Science and Technology Award, which is among the most prestigious and valuable awards offered by the U.S. Government.  The IS&T Awards cover full tuition, stipend and living expenses for three years to undertake a PhD in the U.S. They are offered to only about 40 people worldwide. In fall 2011, Gus will begin a PhD in mathematical physics at the University of California – Berkeley.

“I would like to learn more about the mathematical structures that appear in mathematical physics, especially in relation to an area known as the Geometric Langlands program. The program encompasses a far-reaching set of conjectures that involve many major branches of mathematics such as number theory, representation theory and algebraic geometry,” Gus said.

Upon commencing his graduate studies, he will study advanced coursework subjects to provide the necessary background to begin research in this broad and deep field. “I hope to eventually pursue a career in mathematical research. My immediate goal, however, is to broaden and deepen my knowledge of mathematics. I believe that attending a leading graduate school in the US in the company of similarly motivated students from all over the world is the best way to do this. I look forward to interacting with senior mathematicians as well as fellow graduate students, and to being exposed to various ways of doing mathematics.”

Gus was awarded a BSc with First Class Honours from the University of Melbourne in 2009. He enjoys spending his spare time reading, listening to music and playing with his two border collies.
The prestigious Fulbright program is the largest educational scholarship of its kind, created by U.S. Senator J. William Fulbright and the U.S. Government in 1946. Aimed at promoting mutual understanding through educational exchange, it operates between the U.S. and 155 countries. In Australia, the scholarships are funded by the Australian and U.S. Governments and corporate partners and administered by the Australian-American Fulbright Commission in Canberra. Gus is one of 26 talented Australians to be recognised as a Fulbright Scholar in 2011.

 

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